Ouch, my feet hurt; and some neat skis

Recall how, last week, I responded (to Sam’s inquiry) that my intended route acrss Glacier was Dawson Pass, Nyack Creek, and the Middle Fork.  Well, things turned out differently.  What I really wanted to do was see more alpine, so my Sat-Sun route morphed into following the CDT from Two Medicine north to the St. Mary river, then over Gunsight and Lincoln Passes and down Sprague and Snyder Creeks to Lake McDonald. 

There was beauty, lots (and lots) of rain, wind, more rain (at 7000′ no less), hairball route finding, and solo night hiking in Grizzly country.  In short, I’m rather overwhelmed with the awesomeness, and my feet really hurt.

A more detailed report to come tomorrow.

On a different note, statistics have revealed that my foray into gear posts has been a success, at least insofar as readership is concerned.  The skis gear post from last week quickly became the most read piece of content in the history of this blog, and the shoe and shell posts follow closely behind.  I have mixed feelings about this, but given that I’m writing about common subjects from a rather esoteric point of view, and that the readership (aka Ya’ll) remains fairly small but very dedicated, I’m going to roll with the gear thing for awhile.

To whit: The Marquette Backcountry ski

Press molded from some derivation of plastic, with brass inserts.  No edges as we commonly understand the word.  Short (140cm).  Fat (15cm tip).  Early rise tip, and very aggressive fishscales over almost the whole bottom of the ski.  Designed and made in the Yooopee (hence the name), and 179 bucks retail.

The catch?  They weigh 9 lbs a pair. 

This might be the most innovative and well thought out commercial entries into the fast shoe* market ever.  Of course, the market for ski-snowshoe hybrids is not very big, but it should be a lot bigger, for reasons this ski makes clear.  The Marquette’s dimensions seem ideal for gallavanting through the forest, with maximum fun as the aim.  The lack of proper edges procludes them from all conditions ski touring, as I’m assuming they’d be a nightmare on ice.  They’re too heavy for distance oriented touring.  I bet they climb great on corn, and in the thick trees on a powder day are no doubt a blast.

I certainly don’t need them, nor do they fit into the quiver in an especially utilitarian way, but I’m sure thinking about a future purchase anyway.


*The subject of fast shoes will be revisited in detail soon.

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3 thoughts on “Ouch, my feet hurt; and some neat skis

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